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Good Fat VS Bad Fat

BAD FATS

Saturated fats

Bottom line is, the fewer the better. Less than 7 percent of your daily fat calories should come from saturated fats. Cut back on saturated fats by avoiding dairy items (milk, cheese, yogurt, etc) that are labeled “whole” and “2 percent.” Limit the amounts of red meat and other animal proteins you eat. You can do this by cutting back how often you eat them, how much of them you eat at a meal, or both.

How to spot them: They’re solid at room temperature.

Health notes: A diet high in saturated fat has been linked with elevated cholesterol levels and increased risk for heart disease, so it’s best to limit use of them.

TRANS FATS

Trans fat is considered by many doctors to be the worst type of fat you can eat. Unlike other dietary fats, trans fat — also called trans-fatty acids — both raises your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and lowers your HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Eliminate trans fats from your diet by staying away from foods that contain hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils. (Read the ingredient list!). Some meat and dairy products contain small amounts of naturally occurring trans fat. But most trans fat is formed through an industrial process that adds hydrogen to vegetable oil, which causes the oil to become solid at room temperature.

This partially hydrogenated oil is less likely to spoil, so foods made with it have a longer shelf life. Some restaurants use partially hydrogenated vegetable oil in their deep fryers, because it doesn’t have to be changed as often as do other oils.

TRANS FAT IN YOUR FOOD

The manufactured form of trans fat, known as partially hydrogenated oil, is found in a variety of food products, including: Baked goods, snacks, fried food, creamer and margarine.

GOOD FATS

Monounsaturated fats

Examples: olive oil, peanut oil. Eat plenty of olives, avocados and nuts.

How to spot them: They’re liquid at room temperature but become semi-solid (or cloudy) in the refrigerator.

Health notes: When substituted for saturated fats, monounsaturated fats can help to improve blood cholesterol levels, thereby reducing risk for heart disease.

Polyunsaturated fats

Examples: Canola oil, sunflower oil, walnut oil. You probably get enough omega-6 in your diet, so focus on having more foods packed with omega-3 (salmon, walnuts, etc).

How to spot them: They’re always liquid—even if you put them in the fridge.

Health notes: When used in place of saturated fats, polyunsaturated fats can help to improve blood cholesterol levels, thereby reducing risk for heart disease. “Omega-6” and “omega-3” are other terms used to describe specific types of polyunsaturated oils. Although both omega-6 and omega-3 fats are essential for good health, omega-3s also have additional heart-health and anti-inflammatory benefits.


Reference:

www.webmd.com

www.mayoclinic.com

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